Protest

09/12/15
Author: 
Saleemul Huq

Matt McDonald: Your research has examined developing countries in the context of climate change – what is your role here at COP21?

Category: 
09/12/15
Author: 
Mychaylo Prystupa

The latest draft of the Paris climate agreement released Wednesday is not nearly ambitous enough to prevent catastrophic harm to the world’s poorest countries, or to help them adapt to global warming’s worst effects, experts suggest.

The U.K. advocacy group Friends of the Earth says the COP21 negotiations are about rich countries deciding whose economies will thrive, and who will suffer.

“We know the Titanic is hitting the iceberg —and we’re all on the Titanic,” said the group's senior campaigner Asad Rehman.

Elizabeth May
07/12/15
Author: 
Pablo Solon

A draft climate agreement and decision with 48 pages and 939 brackets has been presented to the ministers in Paris on Saturday 5th of December. Many things can be said about this text. For example, the words “fossil fuels” don’t appear once. There is no proposal [in brackets] to limit coal, oil or gas extraction in the coming years, and no proposal to halt deforestation.

Category: 
08/12/15
Author: 
Nadia Prupis

"By taking to the streets, we will be clearly and unequivocally rejecting the Hollande government's draconian and opportunistic bans on marches, protests, and demonstrations."

Trade Unions and Climate Change: A Conversation with Naomi Klein and Jeremy Corbyn
Category: 
08/12/15
Author: 
Martin Lukacs

US, European and other states push for exclusion of binding Indigenous rights from agreement

 

Indigenous groups from across the world staged a paddle down the Seine river in Paris on Sunday, calling on governments to ensure Indigenous rights are included in the United Nations climate pact currently being negotiated in France.

The United States, the EU, Australia and other states have pushed for Indigenous rights to be dropped from the binding parts of the agreement out of fear that it could create legal liabilities.

Historic Kayak Action demands Indigenous Peoples Rights in Paris Climate Accord | #Canoes2Paris
07/12/15
Author: 
Claudia Cattaneo

An important story is brewing in Canada's Alberta Tarsands and with the new "left wing" New Democratic Party of Rachel Notley. She recently announced a deal with Big Oil to enlarge tarsands production with the support of Forest Ethics, Pembina Institute, Equiterre and even Greenpeace Canada. See article and links below that point to evidence of a split within fossil fuel capital and the "environmental movement".

07/12/15
Author: 
David Schwartzman

Leaders from 147 countries have assembled in Paris for COP 21, the most important climate summit since the 2009 Copenhagen meeting. But climate justice activists worry the result will be the same: platitudes and handwringing, with no firm commitment from Global North countries to drastically curb carbon emissions.

What, then, would a just solution look like?

Category: 
07/12/15
Author: 
Walden Bello

Without concrete, enforceable emissions targets and transition financing, the Paris climate talks will only deepen our climate crisis.

What’s been billed as the meeting that will determine the fate of the planet is now underway in Paris.

The outcome of the 21st Conference of Parties — or COP 21, for short — of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change will determine whether the world might be able to keep average temperatures for the 21st century from rising more than 2 degrees Celsius above the pre-industrial average.

Category: 
06/12/15
Author: 
Morgan Curtis

Last week, the sterile hallways at COP21 rang with the chants of young Pacific Islanders: ‘1.5 to stay alive! 1.5 to stay alive!’ Morgan Curtis reports from the Paris climate talks for New Internationalist.

Category: 
07/12/15
Author: 
SARA STEFANINI

LE BOURGET, France — Any deal at the COP21 summit that cuts greenhouse gas emissions enough to avoid potentially dangerous levels of global warming is going to have to rope in two big polluting industries — shipping and aviation.

The problem?

Both ships and planes are regulated by separate United Nations organizations, and aren’t formally part of the U.N.-led climate talks. The two industries are economic powerhouses, making some countries reluctant to enact expensive regulations.

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